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71 Types of Cotton Fabric, their Uses, & 207 Example Photos!

Cotton is a fiber that’s woven, knitted, or felted to create a big range of fabrics. I’m going to explain 71 different types of cotton fabric, their names, and how they’re used.

In terms of visuals, I’m going to show:

  • Close-up photos of my fabric samples.
  • Photos of the fabrics made into real things, like clothes.
  • Videos, so you can see how fabrics behave differently.

I’m getting my info from ‘Fabric for fashion: the swatch book’ by C. Hallett and A. Johnston (it has 125 real fabric samples inside!), Cotton Incorporated, the Britannica encyclopedia, dictionaries, and fabric stores.

This is a very meaty post, so I recommend pinning this image to bookmark the post for later:

types of cotton fabric

Heads up: This post includes affiliate links like Amazon ones, so I earn from qualifying purchases (at no extra cost to you). Thanks for using them 🙂

I also have an upcoming post on cotton sewing project ideas with patterns.

To buy cotton fabrics online, check out Fabric.com (USA), Minerva (UK), or My Fabrics UK.

If you want sewing ideas and free patterns every week, join my email list.

Click a cotton type to skip to that fabric:

Cotton types:Uses:
Batting / waddingquilting
Bark weaveloose clothes
Basketweaveupholstery
Batistesummer clothes
Bengalineclothes
Broadclothclothes, shirts
Broderie anglaisesummer clothes
Brushed cottoncold weather clothes
Calicotest garments
Cambricclothes
Canvas (plain & duck)bags, upholstery, utility
Chambrayclothes, shirts
Cheeseclothmaking food
Chenilleblankets, clothes
Chinoclothes
Chintzupholstery
Corduroyclothes, upholstery
Crepeclothes
Crossweaveclothes, shirts
Damaskclothes, upholstery
Denimclothes
Double gauzesummer clothes
Drillclothes
Flannelcold weather clothes, shirts
Fleececold weather clothes, blankets
French terryclothes
Gabardineclothes
Gauzesummer clothes, sheer curtains
Ginghamsummer clothes, shirts
Herringboneclothes, upholstery
Jacquardclothes, upholstery
Jerseyclothes
Lawnsummer clothes
Rib knitclothes
Madrasclothes, shirts
Moleskincold weather clothes
Mousselinetest garments, other
Muslintest garments, other
Organdie / organdyclothes
Oxfordclothes, shirts
Piqueclothes
Plaidclothes, shirts, upholstery
Plissesummer clothes
Pointelleclothes
Poplinclothes, shirts
Quilting cottonquilts
Sateenbedding, clothes
Seersuckersummer clothes
Tickingupholstery
Towelingtowels, robes, baby bibs
Twillclothes, shirts
Velvet / velveteenclothes, upholstery, curtains
Velourclothes
Voilesummer clothes
Waffle / honeycombrobes, towels
Windowpaneclothes, shirts, upholstery

Cotton batting / wadding

close up of fluffy white cotton batting / wadding

What is batting? it’s a lofty non-woven material used in the middle of quilted textiles. It creates volume and adds padding for warmth and protection.

Weight: lightweight, but lofty.

Construction: non-woven.

How it feels: fluffy.

oven mitts, quilt, and quilted jacket
Featured: quilted oven mitts by Magic Linen, quilt by Zara Home, and jacket by Everlane.

Video:


Cotton bark weave

textured white cotton bark weave fabric
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is bark weave? it’s a general description for fabrics with this bark-looking texture.

How it feels: it has a bumpy texture.

Uses: it’s not a very stable fabric, so it suits unstructured clothing.


Cotton basketweave

navy basketweave fabric
Basketweave fabric from Minerva (not cotton).

What is basketweave? it’s a textured fabric with a checkerboard look.

Weight: you can get this fabric in many weights, from light to heavy. It depends on the weight of the fiber used.

Construction: it’s a variation of the plain weave. 2+ warp yarns and/or 2+ filling yarns are woven together as one yarn to create a checkerboard effect (source).

How it feels: textured.

Drapey? no.

See-through? no.

Uses: upholstery projects like ottomans, headboards, and curtains.


Cotton batiste

smooth white cotton batiste fabric held in hand
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is cotton batiste? it’s a smooth and lightweight fabric that’s similar to cotton lawn, but it’s a bit thicker.

Better quality batiste is made from combed, not carded yarns. The combing process allows only long, parallel fibers to stay, creating a smoother and more lustrous appearance than carded yarns (more info here about carding/combing yarns).

The very best batiste fabrics are also yarn-mercerized or fabric-mercerized. This means the fabric is immersed in a solution to give it a slight sheen, improve its strength, and improve its reaction to dyes (source).

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: balanced “straight” weave. This implies that the warp and weft are equal (source). 

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? there’s some drape, but it’s crisper than viscose or silk charmeuse.

See-through? some are semi-sheer and others are more non-see-through.

Uses: summer clothing, blouses, lingerie, and handkerchiefs.

cotton batiste dressing gown and pajamas
Lightweight cotton batiste dressing robe and pajamas by Derek Rose.

Video:


Cotton bengaline

black bengaline fabric
Featured: cotton bengaline from Cloth Spot.

What is bengaline? it’s a fabric with a fine crosswise rib. The ribs are very subtle.

Bengaline can be made from many fibers, including cotton, polyester, rayon, etc. You’ll often see lycra / elastane added to give it some stretch, making it ideal for form-fitting trousers and dresses.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: it’s quite smooth. The ribs are very fine and subtle, so the fabric doesn’t feel bumpy or highly textured.

Drapey? it depends on the weight. Some are drapey, but many have a crisp structure (source).

See-through? no.

Uses: it’s often used to make trousers, jackets, skirts, and dresses. When the fabric has some stretch, it suits form-fitting designs like in the photo below:

green dress, trousers, and skirt made from bengaline fabric
Featured: dress by Collectif, pencil skirt by Next, and slim-fit trousers by Banana Republic. These were all made from bengaline fabric.

Video:


Cotton broadcloth

navy broadcloth fabric
This photo really shows the crispness and structure of broadcloth. Featured: Mood Fabrics.

What is broadcloth? it’s a medium weight, plain weave fabric with a soft sheen and fine ribs.

Weight: medium weight.

Construction: plain weave. The fabric is tightly woven and it has very subtle small ribs.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? no, it’s crisp and structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: shirts, crisp blouses, and skirts.

blue and white cotton broadcloth shirts
Cotton broadcloth shirts by Muji.

Video:


Cotton broderie anglaise

black and white broderie anglaise cotton fabric

What is broderie anglaise? a fabric with embroidery and holes in it. It comes in many designs, but floral themes are very popular.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: the main fabric is smooth, with bumpy embroidered surfaces.

Drapey? there’s some drape, but it’s more structured than silk charmeuse and viscose.

See-through? yes, through the holes. If the main fabric is white, it might be semi-sheer in general.

Uses: summer tops and dresses.

red and white cotton broderie anglaise dresses
Broderie anglaise dresses by Whistles and Thought.
white broderie anglaise top and pajama pants
A top and pajama pants (seperate pieces) by Whistles and John Lewis.

Video:


Brushed cotton

close up of white brushed cotton fabric
Here one side is fluffy (the brushed side), and the other side has small ribs.

What is brushed cotton? it’s when one or both sides of a fabric are brushed, giving it a soft and fluffy feel. This also creates warmth, making it great for cold-weather clothing.

According to this book (Amazon link), brushing is sometimes used to disguise poorer quality fabrics (defined as fabrics with a loose weave, and/or lightly spun yarns).

By brushing the fabric, it gives it extra body and fullness, which hides any quality issues. There’s a higher likelihood that this ‘trick’ has happened when the fabric is brushed on both sides.

Here’s a great example I found in my fabric stash. This medium weight cotton has been brushed on both sides and has a loose weave (ie. it has bigger gaps between each yarn):

close up of loosely woven brushed cotton fabric
A poorer quality brushed cotton. It was brushed on both sides to hide the loosely woven construction.

Weight: you can get this fabric in many weights, from light to heavy.

Construction: woven fabric. My first photo shows a twill weave (with diagonal ribs on the back), and my second photo shows a plain weave.

How it feels: soft and fluffy (on the brushed sides).

Drapey? it depends on the weight, which can vary. I made these pajamas from a lightweight, drapey brushed cotton. But the samples pictured above are stiffer and more structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: lightweight brushed cotton is often used in casual shirts and pajamas.

plaid brushed cotton shirt and grey pajamas
Featured: flannel brushed cotton shirt by Everlane and brushed cotton grey pajamas by Desmond & Dempsey.

Video:


Cotton calico

holding white cotton calico fabric

What is calico? it’s known in the UK as an unfinished cotton fabric for making test garments. In the US, it’s called muslin.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: plain weave. The fabric is not tightly woven, so you can see small gaps between each yarn.

How it feels: quite smooth (but not silky smooth).

Drapey? generally no, it has some structure.

See-through? no.

Uses: it’s often used in the fashion industry to make ‘toiles’ (test garments). It’s also used inside furniture to hold the stuffing.


Cotton cambric

black and white cotton cambric fabric
Featured: Atelier Brunette fabric.

What is cotton cambric? it’s a lightweight, closely woven fabric with a slight sheen on one side.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave and the fabric is tightly woven.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? yes, but it’s not as drapey as silk charmeuse or chiffon.

See-through? generally no.

Uses: nightgowns, underwear, slips, handkerchiefs, and children’s dresses.


Cotton canvas (plain & duck)

cream cotton canvas fabric sample
My stiff 12 oz (340g) cotton canvas sample. It’s from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is canvas? it’s a general term used to describe plain-weave fabrics with a more substantial weight. There are two basic types: plain and duck. Duck canvas has a higher thread count and is more tightly woven than plain canvas. Canvas used to be made from hemp, but today it’s normally made from cotton (source).

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: plain weave.

How it feels: sturdy and slightly rough.

Drapey? no, it’s structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: bags, sneakers, blinds, beanbags, soft furnishings, and workwear. It’s also used outside of the home and wardrobe for tents, boat sails, tarpaulins, and awnings.

red, black and navy cotton canvas bags
A weekender bag and backpacks made using cotton canvas. Featured: Sandqvist.
caramel and red cotton canvas aprons
Cotton canvas aprons by Sandqvist and Simon Jersey.

Video:


Cotton chambray

blue and white chambray cotton fabric with ruler
This chambray from The Fabric Store has a subtle multi-colored look from the blue and white yarns used.

What is chambray? chambray fabrics have a subtle multi-colored look. This is because they’re made using two yarn colors; one yarn is normally white. When the other yarn is blue it looks like denim, but it’s much thinner and softer than real denim.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: plain weave. The yarns are woven together tightly, so the gaps between each yarn are small.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? no, it’s quite crisp.

See-through? no.

Uses: summer shirts and dresses.

blue chambray dress, shirt and skirt sewing ideas
Chambray dress by Cotswold Collections, shirt by Abercrombie, and skirt by Kings of Indigo.

Video:


Cotton cheesecloth

white crinkled cotton cheesecloth fabric sample
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is cheesecloth? it’s a lightweight, loosely woven fabric with a crinkled appearance.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave. The fabric is loosely woven, so you can see gaps between the yarns. You can get extra-fine weaves too which have more threads per inch/cm.

How it feels: it has a textured, crepe-like feel.

Drapey? it has some drape, but it’s not as drapey as chiffon or silk charmeuse.

See-through? no.

Uses: it’s mainly used to make cheese and tofu, strain stock, and thicken yogurt (source).


Cotton chenille

brown cotton chenille fabric
A heavyweight (11 oz/yard) cotton chenille from Fabric.com.

What is chenille? a thick, fuzzy fabric (or yarn) with a pile. Pile means the fabric is made from loops that are cut.

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: soft and furry.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? no.

Uses: robes, sweaters, blankets, upholstery, bedding, and pillows.

pink fluffy blanket
Featured: blanket by John Lewis.

Video:


Cotton chino

camel brown chino fabric
Chino fabric from Fab Works.

What is chino? a durable, twill weave fabric with a slight sheen. Sometimes elastane/lycra is added to make the fabric stretchy and more comfortable, making it ideal for slim-fitting chino pants.

Weight: it varies.

Construction: twill weave, so it has fine diagonal ribs. The fabric is immersed in a solution to give it a slight sheen (this process is called mercerization).

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? no, it’s structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: pants/trousers, skirts, jackets, and military uniforms.

ochre yellow chino pants
Featured: Everlane trousers made using chino fabric with some elastane.

Video:


Cotton chintz

white cotton chintz fabric with a slight shine
Unprinted cotton chintz. When it catches the light, chintz can look shinier than this. My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is chintz? in its raw form, chintz is a tightly woven cotton with a shiny glaze on it. It’s often printed with a traditional floral print for use in furnishing.

Weight: medium weight.

Construction: plain weave. The yarns are woven together tightly, so the gaps between each yarn are small.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? no, it’s quite crisp.

See-through? no.

Uses: upholstery for armchairs, sofas, and curtains.

floral chintz chair, sofa, and curtains
These inspiring floral chintz homes are from a House & Garden roundup.

Cotton corduroy

textured khaki cotton corduroy fabric
The front and back of my cotton corduroy sample. It’s from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is corduroy? it’s a pile fabric with raised ribs. The ribs run vertically and are evenly spaced.

Corduroys are grouped based on how many ribs they have per inch:

  • Feathercord: 20-25 ribs per inch.
  • Pinwale: 16-23 ribs per inch.
  • Regular wale: 14 ribs per inch.
  • Wide wale: 6-10 ribs per inch.
  • Broad wale: 3-5 ribs per inch.

(source)

Weight: it varies. You can get light to heavyweight versions.

Construction: woven fabric with a pile. Pile means the fabric is made from loops that are cut.

How it feels: it has a smooth pile, but you can feel the bumpy raised ribs.

Drapey? no, corduroy is structured. Lighter weight corduroys have a bit more drape, but not as much drape as chiffon or silk charmeuse.

See-through? no.

Uses: lighter weight corduroys are great for dresses and shirts. Medium to heavyweight corduroys suit trousers, coats, and upholstery.

yellow cotton corduroy hat and green shirt.
A cotton corduroy hat and shirt by Arket.

Video:


Cotton crepe

dark orange cotton crepe fabric
Featured: Atelier Brunette cotton crepe.

What is crepe? lightweight fabric with a pebble-surface texture and crinkles. It has similarities to gauze.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: woven fabric with quite a loose weave (so there are gaps between each yarn). The crinkled texture is created “using high twist yarns, textured yarns, special weaves, chemical treatments or embossing” (source).

How it feels: it generally has a dry, crinkled texture, but some are softer.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? it has some transparency.

Uses: bridal gowns, evening wear, and summer tops and dresses with a loose fit.

white cotton crepe dress and jumpsuit
Cotton crepe dress and jumpsuit by Net-a-Porter.

Cotton crossweave

pink and red cotton crossweave fabric samples held in hand
My samples are from the Organic Textile Company.
red cotton crossweave fabric pinched
I’m pinching the fabric here to show you that it’s quite crisp, not drapey.
close up of cotton crossweave fabric threads
Here’s a closeup of the fabric – you can see the warp and weft yarns are 2 different colors (red and white, and red and black).

What is crossweave? it’s when different colored warp and weft yarns are woven together to create a multi-colored fabric.

Weight: it varies. My samples in the photo are medium weight.

Construction: plain weave.

How it feels: my samples had a ‘dry’, slightly textured feel.

Drapey? no, it’s quite crisp.

See-through? no.

Uses: casual shirts and summer jackets.

crossweave jacket and shirt
A crossweave summer jacket by Stephen Muldoon and a subtle crossweave shirt by John Lewis.

Cotton damask

teal cotton damask fabric with a pattern
This cotton damask fabric has a contrasting shiny & dull pattern. It’s from Fabric.com.

What is damask? it’s a general term used to describe fabrics with contrasting shiny and dull patterns. The fabric is reversible.

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: it’s a woven fabric made on a jacquard loom. The shiny parts of the fabric are made using a satin weave, and the dull parts are made using a plain, twill, or sateen weave. (source).

Drapey? no, it’s quite structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: evening dresses and jackets, upholstery, curtains, sheets, table runners, and napkins.

green and grey damask tablecloth, cushion and napkin.
Damask tablecloth, napkin, and decorative cushion by LinenLifeIdeas.
red damask dresses
Structured damask dresses by Phase 8 and My Theresa.

Cotton denim

dark indigo denim fabric, front and back
Featured: dark indigo 14 oz denim by The Fabric Store.

What is denim? it’s a sturdy twill weave fabric, often made with blue, grey, or white yarns. Often elastane or lycra are added to make it stretchy and more comfortable.

‘Selvedge/selvage denim’ has a self-finished edge, a tighter weave, and it’s a narrower width (more info here).

‘Raw denim’ isn’t washed after it’s dyed, so it has a more natural look over time as it fades.

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: twill weave, so it has subtle diagonal ribs.

How it feels: it has a dry, slightly textured feel from the small ribs.

Drapey? no, it’s structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: jeans, shorts, skirts, structured dresses, dungarees, and jackets.

blue denim jeans, jacket, and dress, and black skirt.
Denim jeans, jacket, and skirt by Everlane. Denim dress by Sosandar.

Video:


Cotton double gauze

green cotton double gauze fabric
Featured: cotton double gauze by Minerva.

What is double gauze? two layers of thin cotton are attached together with tiny, barely visible stitches every 3/8″ or so. It has a soft and crinkly texture which you can leave as it is, or iron it flat.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: woven fabric with a loose weave (which means there are small gaps between each yarn).

How it feels: soft with a gentle, crinkled texture.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? no.

Uses: summer tops and dresses, skirts, loungewear, light blankets, baby clothes, and baby swaddles.

double gauze dress, baby clothes, and shirt
Featured: dress by Jigsaw, shirt by Everlane, and baby set by Zara. The dress is made from cotton gauze, and the others are cotton double gauze.

Video:


Cotton drill

white ribbed cotton drill fabric
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is drill? it’s a durable fabric with obvious diagonal ribs.

Weight: it varies.

Construction: diagonal weave. This is similar to twill weave, but the diagonal ribs are more obvious because of the coarser yarn count used. This also adds durability to the fabric. (source).

How it feels: it has some texture. You’ll feel little bumps as your hand moves over the ribbed surface.

Drapey? no, it’s quite structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: khakis, army uniforms, shirts, safari jackets, chef coats, and sneakers.

khaki green pants, shirt, and jacket made using drill fabric
Featured: pants / trousers by Aspesi, shirt by Wild Bounds, and jacket by Arket.

Video:


Cotton flannel

cream, brown and green plaid cotton flannel fabric
Featured: cotton tartan flannel by Minerva.

What is flannel? a soft fabric where one or both sides have a fuzzy feel, making it ideal for cold weather. This fuzzy effect is achieved either by brushing the fabric, or through it’s loosely spun weave.

Flannel can be plain, but it’s often made with a plaid or tartan print.

Weight: it varies. Flannel button-down shirts are normally made using light to medium weight flannel.

Construction: woven fabric with a relatively loose weave (this means there are small gaps between the yarns).

How it feels: one or both sides are soft and fluffy.

Drapey? the lighter weight ones are drapey, but heavyweight ones for ‘shirt-jackets’ (aka. ‘shackets’) are less drapey.

See-through? no.

Uses: button-down shirts, pajamas, dresses, children’s clothing, jackets, and sheets. I made these pajama shorts using light to medium weight brushed cotton.

man wearing navy cotton flannel shirt
A cotton flannel button-down shirt by Arket.

Video:


Cotton fleece

red and blue cotton fleece fabric samples
My cotton fleece samples are brushed on one side (the white side) and knitted on the other (the colored side). They’re from the Organic Textile Company.

What is fleece? a soft, fluffy fabric with a brushed pile surface on one or both sides. Note: a ‘pile’ is a layer of cut fibers.

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

How it feels: the brushed side is soft, fluffy, and warm.

Drapey? no, my heavyweight sample in the picture has body / structure.

See-through? no.

Uses: cold weather clothing, fleece jackets, sweatshirts, and blankets.

grey fleece jacket and pink fleece blanket
A grey fleece jacket by Cotton Traders and a cotton fleece blanket by The Company Store.

Video:


Cotton french terry

cream french terry fabric with loop back
This french terry fabric is from My Fabrics UK. The front of the fabric is on the left, and the loop back is on the right.

What is french terry? it’s a stretchy knit fabric. The front is smooth and the back has loops.

Weight: medium weight.

Construction: knitted.

How it feels: soft.

Drapey? no, it has some body/structure.

See-through? no.

Uses: loungewear and gym clothes like sweatpants, hoodies, sweatshirts, and shorts.

man wearing grey french terry hoodie and sweatpants, and man wearing blue sweatshirt.
French terry sweatshirt, sweatpants, and hoodie by Everlane.

Video:


Cotton gabardine

green gabardine fabric swirl
Gabardine fabric from My Fabrics UK.

What is gabardine? it’s a tightly woven twill weave fabric, so it has fine diagonal ribs. It’s water-resistant and sometimes has a sheen. Elastane/lycra is often added to make it stretchy and more comfortable for pants/trousers.

Weight: medium.

Construction: twill weave, so it has diagonal ribs on it.

How it feels: quite smooth, but there is a very subtle texture from the twill weave.

Drapey? no, it’s quite structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: trousers, blazers, jackets, suits, and coats (especially trench coats).

gabardine coat and trousers
A gabardine coat and pants/trousers by Mackintosh and Net-a-porter.

Video:


Cotton gauze

white cotton gauze fabric
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is gauze? it’s a lightweight, loosely woven, and see-through fabric. Gauze is a type of muslin fabric.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave. The fabric is loosely woven, so you can see small gaps between the yarns.

How it feels: soft and light.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? yes.

Uses: it suits loose and unstructured summer clothing like dresses and blouses. It’s also used for baby swaddles and sheer curtains.

baby swaddle cloth and gauze dress
Featured: baby swaddle cloths from Mori and crinkled cotton gauze dress from Net-a-porter.

Cotton gingham

black and white check gingham fabric

What is gingham? it’s a check print that’s woven or printed onto the fabric. It’s normally white and one other color.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: plain weave.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? there’s some drape, but some cotton gingham’s are crisper.

See-through? no.

Uses: summer tops and dresses, aprons, children’s clothing, shirts, and tablecloths.

red cotton gingham shirt, dress, and apron
Featured: gingham apron by Heather Taylor, dress by & Other Stores, and shirt by Ben Sherman.

Cotton herringbone

blue cotton herringbone fabric sample
My samples are from the Organic Textile Company.

What is herringbone? it describes a fishbone pattern woven into the fabric.

Weight: it varies. I have seen lightweight herringbone shirts and heavyweight herringbone upholstery fabric.

Construction: broken twill weave.

How it feels: slightly textured.

Drapey? generally no, it’s quite structured, especially the heavier weight versions.

See-through? no.

Uses: suits, jackets, dresses, upholstery, curtains.

herringbone shirt, blazer, and curtain.
Featured: shirt by Charles Tyrwhitt, blazer by Everlane, and curtain fabric ‘plantation cotton herringbone’ by Tinsmiths. All these items were made with herringbone fabrics.

Cotton jacquard

white diamond cotton jacquard fabric sample
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is jacquard? a raised surface pattern woven into fabric. The pattern itself can vary; my sample above shows diamonds, but florals are also very popular.

Weight: it varies. I have seen lightweight jacquard kaftans and heavyweight jacquard upholstery.

Construction: jacquard weave.

How it feels: it’s textured on both sides, thanks to the raised pattern.

Drapey? generally no, it’s quite structured, especially the heavyweight versions.

See-through? no.

Uses: dresses, skirts, pants/trousers, evening gowns and jackets, sarees, upholstery, and curtains.

jacquard skirt, dress and curtains.
Featured: skirt from My Theresa, Gucci dress from Net-a-porter, and curtains from Home Essentials. These were all made using jacquard fabric.

Video:


Cotton jersey

What is jersey? it’s a general word to describe many types of knitted fabrics. By ‘knitted’ I mean fabric that’s made from yarns interlinked together with loops. This can be done by hand or by machine.

Single jersey is made from plain knit on one side and purl knit on the other.

If it has been mercerized it means it was immersed in a solution that removed the fuzzy surface of the fabric or fiber, giving it a smoother and more lustrous look. Double mercerized means that both the fabric and the yarn have been treated. (source).

cream mercerized single jersey fabric sample
Mercerized single jersey. My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)
navy single jersey fabric with stars
My lightweight single jersey. It’s 100% cotton with a digital print on it.

Jersey sweatshirt fabric has a plain knit on the front and a brushed loop-back on the reverse. It’s thicker and warmer, making it ideal for sweatshirts and hoodies.

white sweatshirt fabric front and back
Heavyweight jersey sweatshirt fabric with a brushed back. My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

Double jersey is made from plain knit on both sides, and it can weigh twice as much. It tends to be more stable than single jersey and won’t unravel when cut.

Interlock jersey is a type of double jersey, made from 2 interconnected rib fabrics. The most common type of interlock jersey is a 1×1 interlock with plain knitting on both sides and fine ribs.

cream interlock jersey fabric sample
Light to medium weight interlock jersey. The sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

If the interlock jersey was knitted on a circular knitting machine it’s called tubular fabric.

An issue you might have if you make clothes with this fabric is ‘spiralling’. This means that after you wash it, the fabric might become distorted and the side seam will twist (so it won’t be vertical anymore). This is a bigger risk if the fabric is lightweight. A solution to this is to cut open the tubular fabric and pass it through a hot-air cabinet to stabilize it; this is called stenting (source).

Weight: it varies from light to heavyweight.

How it feels: soft, smooth, and stretchy.

Drapey? the lighter weight ones have some drape, but some do stand away from the body (in other words, they have some structure). Heavyweight jersey sweatshirt fabric is structured, not drapey.

See-through? no.

Uses: t-shirts, sweatshirts, hoodies, casual dresses, baby clothes.

cotton jersey dresses, tops, and baby leggings
Featured: dress and tops by Arket, baby leggings, sweatshirt and bib by Zara.

Cotton lawn

white cotton lawn fabric sample
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is cotton lawn? it’s a lightweight, semi-transparent fabric that’s crisper than voile, but not as crisp as organdie.

The word lawn might also refer to a starched crisp finish used on many fabrics.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave. It uses a fine, high thread count yarn that’s either carded or combed.

Carded cotton only goes through the basic process of brushing raw/washed fibers before it’s spun, giving the fabric a more ‘raw’ feel. Combed cotton has been through more processing (combing) giving it a smoother finish.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? no, it’s quite structured and crisp.

See-through? yes. The transparency can range from being see-through to almost non-see-through.

Uses: summer shirts, tops and dresses. Lightweight cotton lawn isn’t very durable so it suits looser, unstructured styles.

cotton lawn shirt and dresses
Featured: Everlane shirt, The House of Bruar cotton lawn dress, and Liberty dress.

Video:


Cotton rib knit

white rib knit fabric being stretched
A lightweight all-over rib knit fabric for tops and dresses. My sample is from the Organic Textile Company.
grey 2x2 rib knit fabric being stretched
A heavyweight 2×2 rib knit. It weighs 520gsm (grams square metre) and is made from cotton and polyester. My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)
black and white marl rib knit fabric
A marl or melange effect rib knit – this effect is created by using different colored yarns. The white yarn is of a heavier count than the black yarn, creating a slub effect. This sample has been knitted as a 4×2 rib construction. My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is rib knit fabric? it’s a ribbed fabric with a lot of ‘mechanical’ stretch and recovery thanks to the way it’s constructed.

If the rib knit was knitted on a circular machine, you might have issues with ‘spiralling’. This means that after you wash it, the fabric might become distorted and the side seam will twist (so it won’t be vertical anymore). This is a bigger risk if the fabric is lightweight (source).

Weight: it varies.

Construction: knitted. Rib knits have all the loops on some wales (ribs) on the front, and all the loops on the remaining wales on the back. If the rib structures are equal on both sides you’ll get the best stretch and recovery. For example, 2×2 ribs (the grey sample pictured above is a 2×2 rib).

How it feels: the ribs create a texture. Many feel soft, but some heavyweight ones are rougher.

Drapey? the rib knit cuffs are more structured, but my lightweight all-over rib fabrics have drape.

See-through? no.

Uses: the cuffs and waistbands of sweatshirts, hoodies, and sweatpants. All-over rib fabrics are often used for tight-fitting dresses, tops, and baby clothes.

rib knit dresses, tops, and baby clothes
Featured: rib knit dresses by Net-a-porter, top by Arket, baby bodysuit by Zara, and grey hoodie with rib knit cuffs and waistband by The White Company.

Cotton madras

blue, green, and red madras cotton shirting fabric

What is madras? a handwoven cotton fabric with plaid, checks, or stripes. The pattern is made using semi-permanent vegetable dyes that bleed to create soft and muted colors. A fabric can only be called madras if it comes from the Madras region in India (source).

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? there’s some drape and some body/structure.

See-through? no.

Uses: shirts and dresses.

cotton madras check shirt and dress
Featured: cotton madras check shirt by Crew Clothing, and dress by Monsoon.

Cotton moleskin

front and back of cotton moleskin fabric
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is moleskin? it’s a densely woven fabric with a soft, brushed side that feels a bit like suede. It’s strong and thick. The best moleskin uses fine threads from long-staple cotton. (source 1 and 2).

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: tightly woven twill weave.

How it feels: one side is a bit smoother with a subtle texture from the twill weave. The other side is brushed, so it’s soft and suede-like.

Drapey? no, it’s structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: cold-weather protection clothes, sportswear, sports coats, pants/trousers, etc.

cotton moleskin skirt, jacket, and pants.
These were all made with cotton moleskin. Featured: skirt by Boden, white jacket by Jil Sander via Matches, pants/trousers by M&S, and green jacket by Tom Ford via Mr Porter.

Cotton mousseline

white cotton mousseline fabric sample
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is mousseline? it’s a generic word to describe many types of fabric that are very lightweight, soft, and look similar to muslin (source).


Cotton muslin

close up of loosely woven, white cotton muslin fabric

What is muslin? a lightweight, loosely woven fabric often used to make test garments or to add internal structure to a garment. In the UK, the thicker version of this fabric is called calico.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave. It’s loosely woven, so you can see gaps between each yarn.

How it feels: it feels a bit rougher than cotton voile.

Drapey? it’s slightly crisp and stiff.

See-through? yes.

Uses: making toiles (test garments), lining, interlining, and straining cheese and sauces.

Video:


Cotton organdie / organdy

white cotton organdie fabric
Note: the embroidered flower underneath is not part of the cotton organdie fabric. It’s a different fabric sample underneath the see-through organdie. My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is organdie? a see-through, lightweight, and very crisp fabric.

It’s sometimes confused with organza, which shares its structured quality, but organza is made from silk and manmade fibers, not cotton.

Cotton organdie also crushes and holds wrinkles a lot more than organza.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave. The fabric is loosely woven so you can see small gaps between the yarns. The yarns themselves are very fine and tightly twisted, giving the fabric a crisp and structured character.

How it feels: very stiff and paper-like.

Drapey? no, it’s very structured and stiff.

See-through? yes.

Uses: it’s often used as an overlay on dresses, blouses, collars, and petticoats. It’s a good sew-in interlining/interfacing to add structure to areas of a garment. It’s also used to add a decorative finish to home furnishings.

(Organdie information sources 1, 2 & 3).

organdie tops and dresses
Ideas: top with organdie sleeves (top left by L.K.Bennett), a dress with an organdie overlay (top right by Net-a-porter), and a ruffled overlay on a top (bottom left by Ssense).

Oxford cotton

white oxford cotton fabric swirl
White oxford cotton from Fabric.com.

What is oxford cotton? according to shirtmaker Emma Willis, “oxford cotton is created by weaving the cotton yarn in a certain way giving a textured rather than smooth finish”.

“There are different types, starting with the classic Oxford, then the finer Prince Oxford, which has a slight sheen and more conspicuous weave.” (source). Note: conspicuous means clearly visible.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: quite smooth with a bit of texture in some types.

Drapey? no, it’s quite structured, but not stiff.

See-through? no.

Uses: shirts, pajamas, skirts, and sportswear.

man wearing white shirt, man wearing check pajamas, and a pink oxford cotton shirt
Featured: white shirt by Todd Shelton. Pink shirt and pajamas by Saville Row Company.

Cotton pique

textured white cotton pique fabric
My sample is from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is pique? a knitted fabric with a tiny, textured pattern. The tiny gaps in the pattern make it a breathable fabric. It’s mostly used to make polo shirts.

Weight: it varies.

Construction: according to this book, it’s generally knitted, but I’ve seen stores selling woven versions too. My sample (pictured above) had some stretch in both directions, but it wasn’t very stretchy.

How it feels: there’s a subtle texture.

Drapey? there’s some drape, but not as much as chiffon for example.

See-through? no.

Uses: polo shirts and shorts.

brown cotton pique polo shirt and beige shorts
Featured: polo shirt by Charles Tyrwhitt and athletic shorts by Pangaia. Both were made using cotton pique.

Plaid cotton

black and white cotton check fabric, and plaid fabric

What is plaid? Clain, a Scottish fabric retailer, explains:

“Plaids are any crisscross patterns of two or more colours;
Tartans are plaids with a name to identify a community;
Checks are plaids with a regular pattern, usually of only two colours.”

“Flannel” is sometimes confused with plaid prints, but flannel is actually a type of fabric. It’s a soft, woven material with a fluffy side. It’s often made with a plaid pattern which causes the confusion.

PS. I have a whole post on plaid and tartan sewing ideas.


Cotton plisse

blue cotton plisse fabric with stripes
Cotton plisse stripes from Fabric.com
white cotton plisse fabric with dots
Cotton plisse dots from Fabric.com

What is plisse? a solution is used to shrink parts of the fabric, creating a puckered texture. Different designs can be made using this technique like crinkles, pleats, and dots.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: textured.

Drapey? there’s some drape, but not as much as chiffon for example.

See-through? some are semi-transparent and some are non-see-through.

Uses: summer dresses, tops, and tunics.

check top and white gathered dress
Featured: top by Cotton Traders and dress from Net-a-porter.

Pointelle cotton

white cotton pointelle fabric
My pointelle jersey fabric with small diamond shaped holes. It’s from the Organic Textile Company.

What is pointelle? knit fabrics with a regular pattern of holes. The pattern is normally geometric.

Weight: it varies. Pointelle jersey is normally lightweight, but I have seen thicker sweaters with larger pointelle designs too.

Construction: knitted fabric.

How it feels: soft and stretchy.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? the fabric itself isn’t, but the holes are see-through.

Uses: t-shirts, cardigans, pajamas, children’s clothing, and sweaters.

cotton pointelle top, cardigan, baby bodysuit, and sweater
Featured: halterneck top from Net-a-porter, cardigan and sweater by Reformation, and baby bodysuit by Boden. These were all made from cotton pointelle.

Cotton poplin

green and orange cotton poplin fabric
I’m pinching the poplin here to show you that it’s a crisp and structured fabric. My samples are from the Organic Textile Company.
white cotton poplin fabric samples
close up of cotton poplin's tight weave
In the light you can see the tight weave better.

What is poplin? a crisp fabric with very fine ribs and a subtle sheen.

Weight: light to medium weight.

Construction: plain weave. It has very subtle horizontal ribs because the warp yarns are closer together and finer than the weft yarns.

How it feels: smooth and crisp.

Drapey? no, it’s structured and crisp.

See-through? no.

Uses: lightweight poplins are often used to make buttoned shirts and structured dresses. Medium weight poplins suit trousers.

cotton poplin shirts, pants, and pajamas.
Featured: men’s shirt by H&M, pants/trousers and pajamas by Mr Porter, and women’s shirt by Net-a-porter. These were all made using cotton poplin.

Video:


Quilting cotton

quilting cotton with gardening print

What is quilting cotton? a medium weight and sturdy fabric used to make quilts. It comes in lots of fun prints and colors.

Weight: medium weight.

Construction: plain weave. The fabric is not woven as tightly as other kinds of cotton, like poplin.

quilting cotton held to light with quite tight weave
The yarns are quite close together, but the fabric isn’t as tightly woven as other cotton fabrics like poplin.

How it feels: a little rougher than fabrics used for clothing.

Drapey? no, it’s quite structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: it’s mainly used to make quilts. If you want to make clothes from it, make a structured style because the fabric will stand away from your body, not drape.

2 quilts
Featured: USA map quilt by Fabric.com and blue quilt by Vacilando Quilting Co.

Video:


Cotton sateen

white cotton sateen fabric sample
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is cotton sateen? cotton that’s woven with a sateen-weave has a smooth surface and a dull sheen. Sometimes the yarns are immersed in a solution to increase the sheen (this process is called mercerization).

Weight: it varies.

Construction: sateen weave, giving it a subtle shine in the light. It normally uses finer yarn counts and a high thread count (which means more threads per inch/cm).

How it feels: smooth and structured.

Drapey? no, it’s structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: bed sheets, home decor, and structured clothing.

cotton sateen sheets and dress
Featured: cotton sateen bedsheets by Next and dress by Matches.

Videos:

Here’s a medium weight stretchy cotton sateen with 3% spandex.


Cotton seersucker

grey and white striped cotton seersucker fabric
This is a zoomed-in look at a cotton seersucker from Fabric.com, so the stripes look wider than they do in real life.

What is seersucker? a lightweight fabric with alternating crinkled and smooth stripes. This cotton fabric does not need ironing.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: woven fabric.

How it feels: textured.

Drapey? there’s some drape, but it’s still a little structured.

See-through? no.

Uses: summer suits, dresses, and tops.

cotton seersucker top, jacket, and dress.
Featured: cotton seersucker summer jacket by Matches, top by COS, and dress by Net-a-porter. The subtle seersuckers they used had narrow stripes.

Video:


Cotton ticking

close up of cotton ticking fabric
A medium weight cotton ticking with a herringbone weave. It’s called ‘ticking fabric navy’ by Tinsmiths.

What is ticking? a densely woven fabric with stripes. Traditionally it was woven with narrow even stripes in navy, black, or cream and made for mattresses and pillows. Today you can get it in more stripe patterns and colors (source).

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: ticking can be made using plain, twill, or herringbone weaves. My samples in the pictures were made with a herringbone weave (it has a v-shape pattern). The fabric is tightly woven.

How it feels: smooth with a tiny bit of texture from the herringbone weave (in my sample).

Drapey? it’s quite structured, but medium weight ones have enough drape for curtains.

See-through? no.

Uses: upholstery projects like curtains, blinds, decorative cushions, and covering chairs. I have seen some structured clothing made from ticking too.

cotton ticking chair, cushion, and dress.
Featured: chair upholstered in cotton ticking from Tinsmiths, cushion from John Lewis, and dress from Joy. These were all made using cotton ticking.

Video:


Cotton terry towelling / terry cloth

white cotton terry cloth fabric swirl
Cotton terry towelling from Fabric.com.

What is towelling? it’s a highly absorbent fabric with loops, often used to make towels, robes, and baby items.

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

Construction: it can be woven or knitted.

How it feels: soft and fluffy.

Drapey? some drape.

See-through? no.

Uses: towels, bathrobes, burp cloths, and bibs (normally toweling is just used on the back of burp cloths and bibs).

cotton terry cloth uses: towels and baby bib.
Featured: bunny ear towel by Newbie, towels by The White Company, and baby bib by Next.

Video:

Note: this fabric is 94% cotton and 6% polyester.


Cotton twill

cream and white cotton twill fabric
My samples are from the Organic Textile Company.

What is twill? it’s a type of weave. All twill fabrics have diagonal lines (called ribs or wales) on the front. On heavyweight fabrics the lines are clear to see, but on some lightweight fabrics they’re very subtle.

Twill weaves are normally harder-wearing than plain weaves made using the same yarn and thread count, so they suit high-use utility and casualwear. They also tend to recover from wrinkles better.

Herringbone, houndstooth, and Scottish tartan designs are made using a twill-weave construction too.

Examples of twill weave fabrics are denim, gabardine, drill, and chino.

Weight: you can get this fabric in many weights, from light to heavy.

How it feels: Heavyweight fabrics with a more obvious twill weave feel more textured as your hand moves over the bigger, thicker ribs. Lightweight twill weaves have finer ribs, so they’re smoother.

Uses: lightweight versions are used for shirts, and heavyweight versions are used for trousers, traditional trench coats, etc.


Cotton velvet / velveteen

front and back of a white cotton velvet fabric sample
My sample from Fabric for Fashion: the Swatch book (Amazon link)

What is velvet? a fabric with a thick, short, plush pile. Pile means the fabric is made from loops that are cut.

Note: velvets today are normally made using a combination of fibres, like cotton, silk, viscose, polyester, etc.

Weight: you can get this fabric in many weights, from light to heavy.

Construction: it’s a pile fabric. The warp yarns are woven oven rods. The rods are removed and the loops that are left behind are cut to create the pile.

Velveteen is made in a similar way, except this process is done to the weft yarns.

How it feels: you can get velvets with a smooth texture, and some with a stiff feel. The back has a subtle texture, and the front (with the pile) has a smooth feel when you’re moving your hand in a downward direction. When you move your hand up, it pushes the pile yarns up and feels a bit rougher/more textured.

Drapey? it’s quite structured, but there’s enough drape for curtains.

See-through? no.

Uses: lightweight velvet suits dresses, but not drapey designs like cowl necks. Medium weight velvet is good for trousers, suits, and hats. Medium to heavyweight velvet suits cushions and curtains.

green velvet curtains and multi-colored cushions
Velvet curtains and cushions from John Lewis.

Video:


Cotton velour

green cotton velour fabric
Cotton velour from Fabric.com.

What is velour? a stretchy pile fabric with a sheen. Pile means the fabric is made from loops that are cut. It’s different to velvet because it’s knitted, not woven, so it can stretch.

Weight: it varies.

Construction: knitted fabric with a pile.

How it feels: soft and stretchy.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? no.

Uses: hoodies, tracksuits, figure-hugging dresses, jumpsuits, pants/trousers, pillows, and blankets.

velour uses: tracksuit, pillow, and robe.
Featured: tracksuit by John Lewis, cushion and robe by Wayfair, and baby tracksuit by Baby Mori. These were made using velour (either 100% cotton or a blend).

Video:

Note: this fabric is 80% cotton and 20% polyester.


Cotton voile

white cotton voile fabric swirl
Cotton voile from Fabric.com.

What is voile? a light and see-through fabric with a net-like appearance.

Weight: lightweight.

Construction: plain weave.

How it feels: smooth.

Drapey? yes.

See-through? yes.

Uses: dresses, nightgowns, blouses, lingerie, lightweight curtains, lining, toiles (test garments), and embroidery.

red cotton voile dress and white curtains
Featured: cotton voile dress from Net-a-porter and sheer curtains from John Lewis.

Video:


Cotton waffle / honeycomb

white waffle cotton fabric
Cotton waffle from Fabric.com.

What is cotton waffle / honeycomb? it’s an absorbent fabric with a pattern of raised square outlines.

Weight: medium to heavyweight.

How it feels: textured.

Uses: towels, dishtowels, robes, bedding, crib covers, baby bibs, and quilt backings.

cotton waffle fabric uses: white bedding and grey bath robe
Featured: cotton waffle bedding from Dusk and waffle bath robe from John Lewis.

Video:


Windowpane cotton

cream and black windowpane cotton fabric
Windowpane cotton from Fabric.com.

What is windowpane cotton? it describes fabrics with a box pattern.

Uses: shirts, dresses, scarves, and upholstery.

windowpane uses: sofa, dress, and shirt.
Featured: windowpane couch by Zoffany, shirt by Banana Republic, and dress by L.F.Markey.

Sources

C. Hallett and A. Johnston (2014). ‘Fabric for fashion: the swatch book’ 2016 edition. Laurence King Publishing, London.

Cotton Incorporated. ‘Types of cotton fabric’. [online] Available at: https://thefabricofourlives.com/cotton-fabrics [accessed: 25 Oct 2020]

merriam-webster.com. ‘bengaline’. [online] Available at: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bengaline [accessed: 25 Oct 2020]

merriam-webster.com. ‘calico’. [online] Available at: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/calico [accessed: 25 Oct 2020]

The Drapers Daughter (2016). ‘Crossweave Fabrics Explained’. [online] Available at: https://drapersdaughter.com/blogs/news/105234758-crossweave-fabrics-explained [accessed: 25 Oct 2020]

raystitch.co.uk. ‘Organic cotton voile – natural’. [online] Available at: https://www.raystitch.co.uk/products/organic-cotton-voile-natural [accessed: 25 Oct 2020]

Whaleys (Bradford) LTD. ‘Chintz fabric’. [online] Available at: https://www.whaleys-bradford.ltd.uk/a-z/chintz-fabric [accessed: 25 Oct 2020]

Charles S. Whewell and Edward Noah Abrahart (2020). ‘Conversion to yarn’ [online] Available at: https://www.britannica.com/topic/textile/Conversion-to-yarn [accessed: 26 Oct 2020]

Cloth Spot. ‘‘Gamine’ classic black stretch bengaline fabric’. [online] Available at: https://clothspot.co.uk/product/gamine-classic-black-stretch-bengaline-fabric/ [27 Oct 2020]

britannica.com (2015). ‘Cambric’ [online] Available at: https://www.britannica.com/topic/cambric [accessed: 26 Oct 2020]

Charu Creation Pvt. Ltd. (2020). ‘What is the difference between Cotton Poplin, Cotton Cambric and Cotton Voile?’. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_2-_twQBtg

Whaleys (Bradford) LTD. ‘Cheesecloth fabric’. [online] Available at: https://www.whaleys-bradford.ltd.uk/cheesecloth [accessed: 27 Oct 2020]

Todd Shelton (2019). ‘What is Selvedge Denim?’. [online] Available at: https://toddshelton.com/blog/products/jeans/selvage-denim [accessed: 30 Oct 2020]

K. Whittle (2016). ‘Sewing with Double Cotton Gauze: Colette ♥ Cotton+Steel’. [online] Available at: https://blog.colettehq.com/fabric/cs-x-colette-double-gauze [accessed: 31 Oct 2020]

MasterClass. ‘Fabric 101: What Is Muslin? How to Use and Care for Muslin’. [online] Available at: https://www.masterclass.com/articles/fabric-101-what-is-muslin-how-to-use-and-care-for-muslin [last updated: 2 Oct 2020]

Whaleys (Bradford) LTD. ‘Organdie’. [online] Available at: https://www.whaleys-bradford.ltd.uk/a-z/organdie-fabric [accessed: 1 Nov 2020]

fashionbeans.com. ‘The best oxford shirt (ocbd) guide you’ll ever read’. [online] Available at: https://www.fashionbeans.com/article/ocbd-oxford-shirt-guide/ [accessed: 1 Nov 2020]

CLAREDELATORRE (2019). [online] Available at: https://blog.tinsmiths.co.uk/05/27/ticking-fabrics/ [accessed: 3 Nov 2020]